Iowa State University Researcher Joins Prairie Rivers of Iowa

David Stein of Ames, Iowa has joined Prairie Rivers of Iowa Resource Conservation and Development as the watershed program coordinator replacing former coordinator Kayla Bergman. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from Drake University and a Master of Science in Ecology from Iowa State University. Stein’s passionate regarding conservation issues in Iowa and loves teaching others about the unique ecosystems found in the state. He previously worked as a researcher at both Iowa State and Tufts Universities primarily on prairie restoration and pollinator conservation in Iowa, Missouri and Central Maryland with five years of experience in the field. “I’m very excited to be using my knowledge as both a researcher and conservationist to improve Central Iowa’s natural resources,” relates Stein. “We’re excited about David joining our staff and bringing his expertise to our watershed work.  Prairie Rivers of Iowa continues to provide leadership in watershed planning, education for the public around soil health and water quality and supporting our...
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Watershed Matchup #4: Upper Squaw Creek vs. Lower Squaw Creek

Watershed Matchup #4: Upper Squaw Creek vs. Lower Squaw Creek

This post is part of a series for 2019 Watershed Awareness Month, comparing water quality in a pair of local creeks to learn how land and people influence water. On May 20, the Skunk River Paddlers launched their canoes and kayaks on Squaw Creek at 100th Street in Hamilton County and paddled down to 140th St in Boone County.  The recent rains made it a fast ride! However, the rain also washed a lot of sediment and quite likely some land-applied manure into the stream.  I collected a water sample just before I took this photo and had a lab test it for E. coli bacteria, an indicator of fecal contamination: 2,390 CFU (Colony Forming Units)/100mL.  That’s 10 times the primary contact standard for a single sample (235 CFU/100mL) and just shy of the secondary contact standard (2880 CFU/100mL). Later that day, I collected a sample from Brookside Park in Ames with the help of my son.  The lab results came back at...
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Watershed Matchup #3: College Creek VS Bluestem Creek

Watershed Matchup #3: College Creek VS Bluestem Creek

This post is part of a series for 2019 Watershed Awareness Month, comparing water quality in a pair of local creeks to learn how land and people influence water. With such a big watershed—147,000 acres—we’ll need the help of a lot of people to improve water quality in Squaw Creek.  However, some of the people I talk to assume that water quality is mostly someone else’s problem—it’s the CAFOs fault, or the golf courses, or the residential lawns. By comparing smaller streams, volunteer monitoring can help us untangle some of the influences and serve as a reality check on the finger pointing.  Thanks to the Squaw Creek Watershed Coalition we have some data on a lot of Squaw Creek’s tributaries, some with urban watersheds (College Creek) and some with rural watersheds, some with hog barns (Prairie Creek) and some without (Bluestem Creek).  Some streams were even sampled monthly for a few years—not always the same years, but I’ve included some monthly averages...
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Wetland Conservation Field Day “Wetlands, Wet Times Conservation Practices and Programs” – June 26, 2019

On June 26th from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Prairie Rivers of Iowa will be hosting a conservation field day event at the Hamilton County Kamrar Wildlife Area one mile west of Kamrar, IA at 2704 Lockwood Ave.. Kamrar, IA 50132.  This event is a chance for property owners to learn more about the solutions and assistance needed in regards to the effects that wet weather can have on their land. Representatives from Prairie Rivers of Iowa, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS), the Hamilton County Conservation Board, the Iowa Agricultural Mitigation Bank, Legacy Learning Boone River Valley and Pheasants Forever will be presenting and answering questions. The free event will be held outdoors and will be moved indoors to the Hamilton County Conservation Board Headquarters at Briggs Woods Park in case of bad weather. Be sure to RSVP to Forestry and Land Management Specialist Mike Brandrup @mbrandrup@prrcd.org and stop by! P R O G R A...
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Watershed Matchup #2: Clear Creek VS Clear Creek

Watershed Matchup #2: Clear Creek VS Clear Creek

This post is part of a series for 2019 Watershed Awareness Month, comparing water quality in a pair of local creeks to learn how land and people influence water. Clear Creek @Hyland on May 18 Clear Creek@ Hyland on May 24 Transparency > 60 cm Transparency of 1 cm Orthophosphate 0.1 mg/L Orthophosphate 5 mg/L Clear Creek was true to its name on May 18 when the Squaw Creek Watershed Coalition did its spring water quality snapshot.  Long-time member Ed Engle and three Ames High School students (Wil, Becca, and Nate) filled a transparency tube to the top (60 cm) and the secchi disk at the bottom was clearly visible.  A week later, Rick Dietz tested the same location after a 1.7 inch rainstorm and couldn’t see the disk until he’d poured out all but 1 cm of the water! Water quality can change rapidly.  Sediment* in the water spikes during and after a big rain storm.  So does phosphorus and E. coli.  Nitrate and chloride show strong...
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Watershed Matchup #1:  Long Dick Creek VS Bear Creek

Watershed Matchup #1: Long Dick Creek VS Bear Creek

This post is part of a series for 2019 Watershed Awareness Month, comparing water quality in a pair of local creeks to learn how land and people influence water. Long Dick Creek and Bear Creek both start east of Ellsworth and join the South Skunk River between Story City and Ames.  Both have agricultural watersheds with thousands of acres in both Story county and Hamilton county.  Yet one is dirtier than the other.   You might wonder why… Hey!  Wipe that smirk off your face! “Long Dick” was the unfortunate nickname of a tall guy named Richard who explored the land near the creek when it was still wild prairie.  “Bear Creek” was named because an early settler shot a black bear nearby.  Since the 1860s, the prairie and the bears have disappeared and the man’s nickname has acquired other meanings, but we at Prairie Rivers of Iowa are serious about our water and our history and will have no giggling, thank you very...
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Squaw Creek Water Quality Testing Snapshot

On Saturday May 18 along with the Squaw Creek Watershed Coalition, Ames High students and local volunteers Prairie Rivers of Iowa conducted a water quality testing "snapshot" in Squaw Creek and its tributaries. Nitrate, phosphorus, chloride, clarity and other water quality benchmarks were measured. A special thank you to all the volunteers for your help working towards water quality for everyone in the watershed down to the Gulf of Mexico! ...
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1919 Trans-Continental Motor Convoy – 100 Years Later

1919 Trans-Continental Motor Convoy – 100 Years Later

One hundred years ago, in what began as the idea of one man, America was shown how motor trucks could transport troops, supplies, arms, and ammunition across the nation. This was known in 1919 as the First Trans-Continental Motor Transport Convoy. The Idea and Development  Henry Ostermann, who we talked about in a previous writing, had been piloting convoys for the Army up and down the east coast in the winter of 1917, during World War I. He was also serving as Field Secretary for the Lincoln Highway Association and merged his two occupations into one idea for the convoy. In "A Picture of Progress on the Lincoln Way", published by The Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) in 1920, the LHA  officers and the General Staff in Washington held a conference in June 1919 to discuss convoy details. The success of the run was due to the LHA supplying accurate data to the Army as a "result of its years of study of trans-continental ...
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Roots and mussels on the South Skunk River

Roots and mussels on the South Skunk River

This is a good time of year to enjoy the South Skunk River Water Trail and other local waterways! I joined the Skunk River Paddlers this weekend, paddling my kayak from Anderson Access to West Petersen Park.  While the main purpose of the outing was fun, we also hauled out some tires, cleared some smaller obstructions, and made note larger logjams for followup.  The water was chilly but the air was pleasant. Bluebells were blooming on the bank and we found live mussels in the water (this one is a plain pocketbook). While central Iowa has been spared the extreme flooding that has devastated communities on the Missouri and Mississippi, it's been a wet fall and a wet spring, and we saw the evidence of that on the river. Bark had been scraped off trees by ice flows, lots of bank slumping, and lots of exposed roots. The roots here illustrate the value of riparian buffers. A good stand of perennial vegetation can...
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Learn about volunteer stream monitoring

Ever wondered about the condition of your local creek? What kinds of fish, aquatic insects, and other critters live there? Does the water quality pose a health risk for children wading or kayakers paddling? How much nitrogen and phosphorus is washing downstream to the Gulf? In some cases, a regulatory agency or university is collecting this information, but with 71,665 miles of rivers and streams in the state, that's not a given. Most of what we know about Clear Creek, Worrell Creek, and College Creek in Ames; Montgomery Creek and Prairie Creek in Boone County; Gilbert Creek (Ditch 70) in Gilbert; or Crooked Creek near Stanhope, we know because the efforts of volunteers in the Squaw Creek Watershed Coalition. For other streams in the area, including West Indian Creek in Nevada, Rock Creek in Maxwell, Middle Minerva Creek in Zearing, and Long Dick Creek near Story City, we have almost no information. Iowa DNR has had to scale back its role in providing equipment, training, and IT...
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