Conservation Connection Blog

Urban Fringe Project to Begin in Squaw Creek

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To expand our long-time efforts in the Squaw Creek Watershed, we are beginning an urban fringe project this fall. This project is funded by a Conservation Collaboration Grant from the Iowa NRCS and will be working specifically in the area just northwest of Ames.   In order to serve those landowners in the Squaw Creek […]

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River Clean-Ups: A Dirty, Yet Rewarding Activity

The Conservation Corps of Iowa spent a very hot July day this past month wading in the South Skunk River to collect discarded garbage from the river. They worked on the 5-mile section of the South Skunk River from Anderson Access to Soper’s Mill Access Point in Story County. This collection is just one of […]

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Map your watershed

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August is National Water Quality Month.  Help us showcase ongoing efforts to improve soil health and water quality in Squaw Creek Watershed and the larger South Skunk River watershed by uploading a photo to our crowd-sourced map. Do you have a photo of cover crops on your farm or a rain garden in your backyard?  […]

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ACPF: A menu of conservation opportunities

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I’ll take some cover crops with a prairie filter strip on the contour, a side-dressed nitrogen application, a grassed waterway, and riparian buffer strip.  Hold the soil, please. The research that informed Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy made it clear that there’s a large menu of conservation practices that can keep nutrients and soil on our […]

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Bringing People Together Can Be a Dirty Job

  If you haven’t heard of Project AWARE, it’s time to listen up. For the past fifteen years, the Iowa DNR has successfully implemented a week-long river trash cleanup that most would consider too much of a logistical nightmare to even attempt. This past week however, marked Project AWARE’s (A Water Awareness River Expedition) fifteenth […]

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What’s a HUC? Understanding hydrologic units

Story County is taking the forward-looking step of assessing all its HUC12 watersheds so it has solid information for managing its water resources.  Prairie Rivers of Iowa is excited to be part of the project: our team is busy mapping potential conservation practices using the Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework.  That’s great, you might say, but what’s […]

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Benefits of Prairie Roots in the Iowa Landscape

Prairie Rivers of Iowa is now the proud owner of a prairie root display, grown by the University of Northern Iowa Tall Grass Prairie Center. The display boasts five foot tall Big Bluestem and Butterfly Milkweed roots. These examples of fibrous and tap prairie roots will help PRI staff engage the public in conversations about […]

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Prairies… They aren’t weeds!

  All too often when referencing a prairie or natural area, the comment, “That’s just a bunch of weeds” is inevitable. To be fair, a lot of natural areas, roadsides. and prairie plantings are plagued by invasive and typically non-native species that are weeds. Including wild parsnip, giant ragweed, amaranth, button weed, certain thistles, reed […]

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Soil and Water Conservation Week Partnership Spotlight: E Resources Group

In honor of Soil and Water Conservation Week, we have interviewed some of our partner organizations for the Watersheds & Waterways Program in order to share more about their organization and our partnership with them. E Resources Group Jean Eells, Director E Resources Group is organized by Jean Eells, working in Educational Program Evaluation, Education […]

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Soil and Water Conservation Week Partner Spotlight: Heartland Cooperative

In honor of Soil and Water Conservation Week, we have interviewed some of our partner organizations for the Watersheds & Waterways Program in order to share more about their organization and our partnership with them. Heartland Cooperative Jason Danner, Central Regional Sales Manager Heartland Cooperative is a full service, value added cooperative that has been […]

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