Iowa State University Researcher Joins Prairie Rivers of Iowa

David Stein of Ames, Iowa has joined Prairie Rivers of Iowa Resource Conservation and Development as the watershed program coordinator replacing former coordinator Kayla Bergman. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science from Drake University and a Master of Science in Ecology from Iowa State University. Stein’s passionate regarding conservation issues in Iowa and loves teaching others about the unique ecosystems found in the state. He previously worked as a researcher at both Iowa State and Tufts Universities primarily on prairie restoration and pollinator conservation in Iowa, Missouri and Central Maryland with five years of experience in the field. “I’m very excited to be using my knowledge as both a researcher and conservationist to improve Central Iowa’s natural resources,” relates Stein. “We’re excited about David joining our staff and bringing his expertise to our watershed work.  Prairie Rivers of Iowa continues to provide leadership in watershed planning, education for the public around soil health and water quality and supporting our...
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Wetland Conservation Field Day “Wetlands, Wet Times Conservation Practices and Programs” – June 26, 2019

On June 26th from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Prairie Rivers of Iowa will be hosting a conservation field day event at the Hamilton County Kamrar Wildlife Area one mile west of Kamrar, IA at 2704 Lockwood Ave.. Kamrar, IA 50132.  This event is a chance for property owners to learn more about the solutions and assistance needed in regards to the effects that wet weather can have on their land. Representatives from Prairie Rivers of Iowa, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS), the Hamilton County Conservation Board, the Iowa Agricultural Mitigation Bank, Legacy Learning Boone River Valley and Pheasants Forever will be presenting and answering questions. The free event will be held outdoors and will be moved indoors to the Hamilton County Conservation Board Headquarters at Briggs Woods Park in case of bad weather. Be sure to RSVP to Forestry and Land Management Specialist Mike Brandrup @mbrandrup@prrcd.org and stop by! P R O G R A...
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Squaw Creek Water Quality Testing Snapshot

On Saturday May 18 along with the Squaw Creek Watershed Coalition, Ames High students and local volunteers Prairie Rivers of Iowa conducted a water quality testing "snapshot" in Squaw Creek and its tributaries. Nitrate, phosphorus, chloride, clarity and other water quality benchmarks were measured. A special thank you to all the volunteers for your help working towards water quality for everyone in the watershed down to the Gulf of Mexico! ...
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1919 Trans-Continental Motor Convoy – 100 Years Later

1919 Trans-Continental Motor Convoy – 100 Years Later

One hundred years ago, in what began as the idea of one man, America was shown how motor trucks could transport troops, supplies, arms, and ammunition across the nation. This was known in 1919 as the First Trans-Continental Motor Transport Convoy. The Idea and Development  Henry Ostermann, who we talked about in a previous writing, had been piloting convoys for the Army up and down the east coast in the winter of 1917, during World War I. He was also serving as Field Secretary for the Lincoln Highway Association and merged his two occupations into one idea for the convoy. In "A Picture of Progress on the Lincoln Way", published by The Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) in 1920, the LHA  officers and the General Staff in Washington held a conference in June 1919 to discuss convoy details. The success of the run was due to the LHA supplying accurate data to the Army as a "result of its years of study of trans-continental ...
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2018 Year in Review

2018 Year in Review

The Watersheds & Waterways Program Year in Review for 2018. It was a year full of continuing projects, new projects, and expansion of current projects. Our program has grown and will continue to grow in 2019. Check back for current programming on our website and social media!...
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Nutrient loading is like… beer

Nutrient loading is like… beer

On June 14, Squaw Creek rose to flood stage.  On the same day, nitrate concentrations in Squaw Creek dropped from 11.8 mg/L to 2.7 mg/L.  Does that mean that June’s storm clouds had a silver lining for Iowa’s nutrient reduction efforts?  I'm afraid not. The nitrate concentration in a river is an important number if (like the Des Moines Water Works) you’re treating it for drinking water and need to stay below 10 mg/L. However, when it comes to hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, the number that matters is the nitrate load that is sent downstream: the nitrate concentration in the water times the flow of water in the river. Not following me?  Ponder this analogy.  Nutrient loading is like beer.  I enjoy craft beer and have learned to pay close attention to the alcohol by volume number, which can range from 5% in a lager to 10% in an imperial IPA.  In order to avoid having my judgement impaired, I...
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Soil as Sponges

Soils that are rich in organic matter act like sponges, soaking up heavy rains rather than allowing water to pond or run off the surface. By reducing runoff, healthy soils prevent sediment, nutrients, and other pollutants from washing into lakes and rivers. A spongy soil can also hang on to more water after the excess has drained, helping sustain crops through dry periods. Healthy soils can help reduce the negative effects of both floods and droughts, benefiting crops and downstream communities. Healthy soils can also be sponges for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, with the potential to help prevent destructive climate change by storing more carbon in the form of organic matter. Find out how you can turn your soil into sponges: In Town On the Farm During construction, topsoil is often removed and remaining soils are compacted by heavy equipment.  Soils in a new development act more like concrete than sponges.  It can take decades for plant roots and freezing and thawing to reverse...
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Spring, Where Art Thou?

Spring, Where Art Thou?

It's been two months since we last wrote. And were talking about Spring at that time! But Spring has taken its sweet time to get here. With snow lasting well into April, we might just jump ahead right into Summer. But we need Spring. It is an important step to transition from Winter to Summer. Although I am a huge fan of Summer, Spring has many good points we cannot overlook. We need this in-between time. Farmers might be rushed, but they need to plant their crops. The ground needs to warm up to be able to awaken seeds and dormant plants. Small producers and artisans, scrambling, will need to get ready for Farmers Markets. My house will thank me again this year as I spring clean and open the windows to let in the fresh air. Nothing like a cool spring breeze floating in. I enjoy the windows-open season no matter how short it might be before I take the plunge...
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Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Springs into 2018

Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Springs into 2018

It is finally March and with that comes the promise of Spring! The Byway is gearing up for a wonderful 2018. We are into grant writing season and as we wait for large state-wide projects to come to fruition, we are happy to tackle  smaller localized ones. One project just completed was for the community of Westside. The residents recently developed a park, the Eugene Kock Memorial Park, in honor of a local man who lost his life in Vietnam many years ago. The park has engraved paver bricks that can be purchased, seating for visitors, and a military sculpture placed in the center. The area is flanked by flags and soon will have an interpretive panel we created about the community placed there as well. We continue to work with the Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) on other interpretive panels. Three smaller ones will be placed in the City of Jefferson's east entrance as part of their improvement project. The panels will...
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