Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs Awards Prairie Rivers of Iowa a Historic Resources Development Project (HRDP) Grant

Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs Awards Prairie Rivers of Iowa a Historic Resources Development Project (HRDP) Grant

The Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs has awarded Prairie Rivers of Iowa a Historic Resources Development Project (HRDP) grant to assess the condition of the approximately 319 properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places along the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway (LHHB) in Iowa.

Many historic properties have been lost over the years, and this survey is a critical first step in preserving them. Historic properties can be especially at risk because awareness of their value and knowledge of appropriate upkeep methods is often lost over time.

Established in 1913, the LHHB was the country’s first improved coast-to-coast highway. In 2021, it was nationally recognized by the National Scenic Byway Foundation as a National Heritage Byway for its contribution to transportation history. 

Lincoln Hotel Lowden Iowa
Lincoln Highway Bridge Tama Iowa

Like the wagon train trails and railways before it, the Lincoln Highway opened cities and rural communities alike to vital population and commercial growth more than 100 years ago and brings heritage tourism and pride of place today. One-third of Iowans still live along the Lincoln Highway corridor and recognition of the Lincoln Highway connection is evident in festivals such as Nevada’s Lincoln Highway Days celebrated every August, and parks, like the Lincoln Highway Lion’s Club Tree Park in Grand Junction.

If you own or have knowledge of a property on the Lincoln Highway that is on the National Register of Historic Places, we would like to hear about it. Please contact Shellie Orngard, Project Manager, sorngard@prrcd.org.

Promise Road: How the Lincoln Highway Changed America

Promise Road: How the Lincoln Highway Changed America

The exhibition Promise Road: How the Lincoln Highway Changed America will be open at the Gutekunst Public Library in State Center August 8-20. Local historian Harlan Quick will give a presentation on “The Impact of the Lincoln Highway on Marshall County” at 5:30 pm on Wednesday, August 10, in the library’s Fireside Room.

The exhibition then moves to the Nevada Public Library on Monday, August 22, in time for Lincoln Highway Days, August 26-27.

Promise Road tells the story of how the Lincoln Highway knit together the nation in the early days of the automobile and helps communities grow. It was created by Prairie Rivers of Iowa with funding from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs, a grant from the Greater Iowa Credit Union, and support from the Iowa Department of Transportation.

“Many of us have driven the Lincoln Highway but haven’t realized its significance for the unfolding of our country’s modern history. This exhibition tells that story,” said Shellie Orngard, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway coordinator.

Lincoln Highway Traveling Exhibit

The building of the Lincoln Highway was initiated in 1913, when most people traveled by foot or by horse and the roads were mud or gravel. America’s first coast-to-coast highway, the Lincoln Highway starts in Times Square, New York City, and travels through 14 states, ending at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. A dramatic story of ingenuity, personality, and commerce, Promise Road will engage visitors in a new understanding of and appreciation of our forgotten past and what it means for us today.

1st president of the Lincoln Highway Association Henry Joy in the mud (gumbo) - near La Mouille, Iowa June 1915.

The exhibit’s first stop was at the Greene County Historical Society in Jefferson, Iowa including a special presentation by Bob and Joyce Ausberger of rural Greene County, who helped found the new national Lincoln Highway Association in 1992, which now has hundreds of members across the country and around the world. It will eventually travel to all the 13 Iowa counties traversed by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway.

In 2021, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway in Iowa was recognized as a National Scenic Byway. The National Scenic Byways Program is a voluntary, community-based program administered through the United States Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to recognize, protect, and promote America’s most outstanding roads.

Prairie Rivers of Iowa manages the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway in Iowa on behalf of the Iowa Department of Transportation.

Lincoln Highway Traveling Exhibit at Greene County Historical Museum
Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridges

Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridges

During our April meeting while discussing the bridge in Tama, we had a conversation about James Marsh and his Rainbow Arch Bridge designs along the Lincoln Highway. So I reached out to our resident experts, Bob and Joyce Ausberger for a history lesson on these bridges and their significance to the Lincoln Highway.

James Marsh was the builder and promoter of several Rainbow Arch Bridges. He graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. His company was N.E. Marsh & Son Construction Company in Des Moines. The bridge designs were formed by the conjunction of new technology, and reinforced concrete. The previous stone bridges were more expensive and labor-intensive.

By 1893 Marsh had constructed numerous bridges in Iowa – a three-mile elevated railroad structure in Sioux City and three bridges in Des Moines. Similar bridges were built in Montana, South Dakota, Minnesota, Colorado, and five other western states.

James Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge Design

Patent Photo credit: wikipedia.org

Beaver Creek Bridge on the Border of Greene and Boone Counties in Iowa

Photo credit: bubbasgarage.com

The Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge (known as Beaver Creek Bridge) is located on the Lincoln Highway on the border of Greene and Boone County in Ogden at 210th Street and was built in 1919. This bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.

Beaver Creek Bridge

Photo credit: Garry Gardner/wikipedia.org

Photo credit: John Zeller/Iowa DOT

Numerous single-span concrete arches can be found in rural Iowa, but multiple-span examples are rare. Moreover, among those concrete arches remaining in the state, the Eureka Mill Bridge is one of the earliest such arch structures designed by the state highway commission. We are fortunate to have these existing samples of these two types of bridges still remaining

This article was reprinted with permission from the Iowa Lincoln Highway Association Summer 2022 Newsletter, Volume 27, No, 2.

Lincoln Highway Traveling Exhibition  Premiers at the 2022 Bell Tower Festival

Lincoln Highway Traveling Exhibition Premiers at the 2022 Bell Tower Festival

An audiovisual exhibition telling the story of the national Lincoln Highway debuts at the Bell Tower Festival in Jefferson this year. Promise Road: How the Lincoln Highway Changed America opened June 9 at the Greene County Historical Society Museum and will remain through June 26.

“Many of us have driven the Lincoln Highway but haven’t realized its significance for the unfolding of our country’s modern history. This exhibition tells that story,” said Shellie Orngard, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway coordinator.

Lincoln Highway Traveling Exhibit

The building of the Lincoln Highway was initiated in 1913, when most people traveled by foot or by horse and the roads were mud or gravel. America’s first coast-to-coast highway, the Lincoln Highway starts in Times Square, New York City, and travels through 14 states, ending at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. A dramatic story of ingenuity, personality, and commerce, Promise Road will engage visitors in a new understanding of and appreciation of our forgotten past and what it means for us today.

The exhibition culminates with a presentation on June 26 by Bob and Joyce Ausberger of rural Greene County, who helped found the new national Lincoln Highway Association in 1992, which now has hundreds of members across the country and around the world.

1st president of the Lincoln Highway Association Henry Joy in the mud (gumbo) - near La Mouille, Iowa June 1915.

After this first stop in Greene County, the exhibition will travel to Marshall and Story counties, and on to the rest of the 13 Iowa counties traversed by the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway.

The traveling exhibit Promise Road: How the Lincoln Highway Changed America was funded in part by a grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs and with support from the Iowa Department of Transportation.

In 2021, the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway in Iowa was recognized as a National Scenic Byway. The National Scenic Byways Program is a voluntary, community-based program administered through the United States Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to recognize, protect, and promote America’s most outstanding roads. 

For more information about the national Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway in Iowa, visit Prairie Rivers of Iowa’s website at prrcd.org. Prairie Rivers of Iowa is a nonprofit focused on conserving natural and cultural resources, using its expertise to address Iowa’s most challenging needs. It manages the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway in Iowa on behalf of the Iowa Department of Transportation.

Update on Status of the Bridge over Mud Creek in Tama, Iowa

Update on Status of the Bridge over Mud Creek in Tama, Iowa

The bridge over Mud Creek in Tama, Iowa, will be preserved in its current location, in a decision made at the March 21 Tama City Council meeting. City Council member Ann Michael, who had been pushing to repair the bridge, said after the meeting, “It took the work of all of us to preserve this historic little bridge.”

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and considered one of the most visited sites along the Lincoln Highway nationally, the Tama Bridge has been cited for repair since 2016. 

Historic Lincoln Highway Bridge in Tama, Iowa

With the assistance of Prairie Rivers of Iowa, nearly $100 thousand dollars have been raised for that purpose which, along with funding from the Iowa Department of Transportation would have paid for the repairs, but various administrative issues have delayed the project.

Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Coordinator Shellie Orngard at Tama City Council

PRI Lincoln Highway National Heritage Byway Coordinator Shellie Orngard speaking in support of the historic Lincoln Highway Bridge to Tama City Council. KCRG Photo

Earlier this year, the Tama City Council began to consider moving the bridge and replacing it with a culvert, sparking a nationwide campaign to contact the Council or attend City Council meetings and ask them to save the bridge and repair it in place.

To gain a full understanding of the options, Tama city staff called a meeting with the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) that included representatives from the Iowa Department of Transportation, City of Tama, the structural engineering firm Shuck-Britson, Prairie Rivers of Iowa, and the Lincoln Highway Association. SHPO indicated that moving the bridge without prior approval would cause it to be de-listed from the National Register.

A process to gain such pre-approval could take two years, with no guarantees of re-listing. Additionally, the project engineer cast doubt on the feasibility of moving the concrete structure and maintaining its structural integrity. With this information, and the prodigious input from people across the country, the Tama City Council decided to let bids for repair through the Iowa DOT. City Council members said they were surprised by the amount of interest and the passion for bridge’s preservation from so many people across the country.

Thirteen Earth-Friendly Stops Along the Lincoln Highway National Heritage Byway

During the early 20th century visitors along the Lincoln Highway used travel as a new way to connect with nature while creating new adventures! Today travelers are still making connections with natural, scenic, and recreational opportunities whether it’s during a short day trip or a full drive along  460 miles across 13 counties along the Lincoln Highway National Heritage Byway in Iowa.

For a complete breakdown,  be sure to view and download our Activity and Recreation and Camping Guides!

Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center Aquarium
Recreation and Camping Guide

As you enjoy the outdoors this year, and as we recognize Earth Day later this month, it is a good time to review your outdoor ethic. Please be responsible, protect our natural world, and be considerate of other visitors and the landscape. Remember to always check local regulations and guidelines. Here are some universal outdoor ethics worth following: The 7-Principles.

There are so many grand views to see, hikes to take, fish to catch, bike trails to ride, and nature’s treasures to discover we can’t name them all! Below are thirteen earth-friendly stops along the Lincoln Highway National Heritage Byway you should not miss (one for each county along the Byway)!

MISSISSIPPI RIVER ECO TOURISM CENTER – Clinton County
3942 291st St, Camanche, IA

  • 8,000-Gallon River Fish Aquarium
  • Wildlife of the River Eco-System
  • Turtle Island Display
  • Giant Cottonwood
  • Iowa State Record Fish Display
  • Touch Tank
  • Riverbank Display
Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center Aquarium

Randy Justis/Boyd Fitzgerald Imaging Solutions Photo

Hound Dog Rock Shop – Cedar County
115 Lombard Street Clarence, IA

  • Collectables From Around the World
  • Minerals, Gems, and Fossils
  • No 2 Stones Alike
  • Efforts Made to Ethically Source
  • Custom Made Jewelry
  • All Ages Welcome
  • Rock On!
Hound Dog Rock Shop

Hound Dog Shop Photo

Mount Trashmore – Linn County
2250 A Street SW, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

  • Former Landfill Transitioned to Recreational Site
  • Hiking
  • Walking
  • Mountain Biking – Wear a Helmet!
  • Educational tours
  • Picnicking
  • Some Steep Grades
Mount Trashmore Trails

Solid Waste Agency – Cedar Rapids/Linn County Photo

Jumbo Well – Benton County
Commemorative Plaque, Corner of 8th and 8th, Belle Plaine, IA
Exhibit, Belle Plaine Area Museum Henry B. Tippie Annex

  • Known as the Eight Wonder of the World
  • Artesian Well That Ran Loose for Over a Year in 1886
  • Known to “Sing” Until Silenced by Engineers
  • Gushed 3 Million Gallons a Day
  • Took 130 Barrels of Cement to Cap
  • Now an Aquifer Less Than 200 Feet Below Belle Plaine
Jumbo Well Belle Plaine Iowa

Iowa Adventurer Photo

Otter Creek Marsh – Tama County
One Mile NW of Chelsea, IA on E66

  • 1,200-Acre Wetland
  • Viewing Platform
  • Migrating Waterfowl
  • Aquatic Wildlife
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Kayaking, Canoeing, Small Boats Allowed
Viewing Platform Otter Creek Marsh

Cindy Hadish/Homegrown Iowan Photo

Marietta Sand Prairie Preserve – Marshall County

1744 Knapp Avenue, Albion, IA

  • Rare Sand Prairie
  • 56 Acres of Sand Prairie Remnant
  • 210 Acre Seep Wetland Addition
  • Wildlife and Flora Viewing
  • Rare Plant Species Unique to Sand Prairies
  • Includes Some Threatened or Endangered Ferns
  • Hunting
Marietta Sand Preserve Volunteers

Iowan Natural Heritage Foundation Photo

Reiman Gardens – Story County

Reiman Gardens
1407 University Blvd., Ames, IA

  • 17 Acre Site
  • Indoor and Outdoor Gardens
  • Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing
  • Lake Helen
  • CoHorts Dancing Chimes Plaza
  • Bald Cypress Allee
  • Hughes Conservatory
Reiman Gardens

Reiman Gardens Photo

Ledges State Park – Boone County

1515 P Ave, Madrid, IA

  • One of Iowa’s Most Historic and Scenic Nature Destinations
  • Sandstone Ledges Above Des Moines River
  • Pea’s Creek “Canyon”
  • Hiking
  • Camping
  • Streamwalking/Wading
  • Boating
PRI Kids Camp Ledges State Park

Prairie Rivers of Iowa Photo

Raccoon River Valley Trail – Greene County

507 E Lincoln Way, Jefferson, IA

  • Trailhead for 89-Mile Long Multi-Use Recreational Trail
  • Biking, Walking, Hiking, Snowmobiling, Cross Country Skiing
  • Woodland, Prairie, Wildflower and Agricultural Scenic Views
  • Camping, Restrooms, and Shower Facilities
  • 600 Foot Long Trestle Bridge
  • Parking
  • User Permit Required (18 Years and Older)
Raccoon River Valley Trail Trailhead in Jefferson

Raccoon River Valley Trail Association Photo

Swan Lake State Park – Carroll County

22676 Swan Lake Trail, Carroll, IA 

  • Camping
  • Biking, Walking, and Hiking
  • Bird Watching and Wildlife
  • Fishing
  • Boating, Canoeing & Kayaking
  • Swimming
  • Horseback Riding
American White Pelican Carroll County Iowa

Matt Wetrich Photo

Yellow Smoke State Park – Crawford County

2237 Yellow Smoke Rd, Denison, IA

  • 358 Acre Recreation Area
  • Biking, Walking, and Hiking
  • Bird Watching and Wildlife
  • Fishing
  • Boating with Concrete Ramp
  • Beach Swimming and Bathhouse
  • Camping
Yellow Smoke Park

Crawford County Conservation Photo

DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge – Harrison County

1434 316th Lane, Missouri Valley, IA

  • 8,365 Acre Refuge
  • DeSoto Lake (Oxbow Lake)
  • Migratory Bird Corridor
  • Tallgrass Prairie, Bottomland Forest, and Wetland Habitats
  • Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center
  • Steamboat Bertrand Archeological Exhibit
  • Rare Glimpse of What Pre-Settlement Iowa Looked Like
Heron at DeSoto Bend Wildlife Refuge

Troy Hugen Photo

Hitchcock Nature Center – Pottawattamie County

27792 Ski Hill Loop, Honey Creek, IA 

  • Rare Wind-Deposited Loess Hills
  • Walking, Hiking, Camping
  • Snowshoeing and Cross Country Skiing
  • Seasonal Migrating Raptors and Pollinators
  • Observation Tower
  • Archery Range
Badger Ridge in Loess Hills Harrison County Iowa

Pottawattamie County Conservation Photo