May showers bring awesome graphs!

Last weekend's rains (5-17-2020) provide a clear illustration of how water and nitrate make their way to Squaw Creek. How water reaches Squaw Creek after a rain It started raining late Saturday night and stopped around 3AM Sunday. The rain gage outside my house in Ames showed 0.9 inches.  The water hitting my driveway and other paved surfaces in my neighborhood enters a storm sewer that goes directly to a tributary of Squaw Creek.  (In newer neighborhoods, the water would be slowed down by a pond or detention basin).  This runoff takes about an hour to make its way down Squaw Creek to the USGS stream gage at Lincoln Way.  In response to urban runoff and the rain that fell directly on the channel, we can see a quick rise in the water level, and quick fall. Over the next 15 hours, Squaw Creek rose another foot as it was joined by water that fell as far away as Stratford and Stanhope. Other...
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The Strength and Power of Public Support

Public support can do wonderful things and we are witnessing its strength during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are seeing people come together as seamstresses make masks, distilleries make hand sanitizers, and manufacturers retool to make personal protective equipment (PPE). Social distancing, no large groups, and wearing masks are our new "normal." Hopefully there will be a vaccine soon to eradicate this virus. Re-reading the Winter edition of The Lincoln Highway Forum https://www.lincolnhighwayassoc.org/forum/, our attention was drawn to an article written in 1914 by Henry B. Joy, President of the Lincoln Highway Association. He talks about public support for the Lincoln Highway and commented that the Highway helped spur the improved road movement for two reasons: 1) It was a definite accomplishment with a "real, tangible goal towards which to work as well as crystallizing scattered efforts." 2) It was a monumental tribute to "our martyred president." The 3,400 miles of road was in need of improvements and Carl Fisher, the idea man behind...
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Together We Can Continue Our Work! – #GivingTuesdayNow

During our 20th year as an organization, our work is more important than ever. This recent pandemic reminds us of how important life is and the steps we need to take to improve the environment while helping communities in Central Iowa and along the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway. Tuesday, May 5th is #GivingTuesdayNow a global day of unity and giving. Your donation to Prairie Rivers of Iowa will go a long way towards helping us continue our hard work towards economic development through the restoration and conservation of Iowa’s cultural and natural resources! Please visit us at https://bit.ly/GivingTuesdayNowPRI and consider a one-time gift or a scheduled monthly donation. Working together we’ll get through this pandemic while continuing the work to improve water and soil quality while increasing pollinator habitat in Central Iowa. Your gift can also help in our work towards preserving communities, attractions, and small businesses along the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway. To learn more about how you can help, visit http://www.prrcd.org/donations/ or contact us at prrcd@prrcd.org or by calling (515) 232-0048. We...
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Prairie Rivers of Iowa Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Program Receives National Scenic Byway Interpretation Award

The National Scenic Byway Foundation whose mission is to empower, strengthen and sustain byways has awarded the 2020 Organization Award for Interpretation to Prairie Rivers of Iowa and its Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway (LHHB) program. In the announcement, the foundation cited Prairie Rivers of Iowa’s use of interpretive panels across the state that enhance visitor experiences while traveling the byway. "We’re honored to receive the award. This project started five years ago with two panels and now to date, we’ve created 20 panels throughout the communities of Westside, Jefferson, Scranton, Grand Junction, Ogden, Nevada, Montour and Tama. Our immediate goal is to install at least one interpretive panel in each of the 43 communities the Lincoln Highway connects with in Iowa,” says Prairie Rivers of Iowa LHHB Coordinator Janice Gammon. One of the most recently installed panels honors the first Field Secretary of the Lincoln Highway Association Henry Ostermann who lost his life on the highway near Montour, Iowa in 1920. “The more I...
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20 Ways to Reduce Nutrient Loss On Farms

In honor of Prairie Rivers of Iowa's 20th anniversary, here's a list of 20 conservation practices that can be used on the farm to reduce the amount of excess nutrients entering the groundwater including links to more information from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship Clean Water Iowa program.     BIOREACTOR SATURATED BUFFER WETLANDS DRAINWATER MANAGEMENT STREAM BUFFER SHALLOW DRAINAGE PERENNIAL CROPS  EXTENDED CROP ROTATION LAND RETIREMENT WETLANDS COVER CROPS SIDEDRESSING SPRING-APPLIED NITROGEN NUTRIENT SOURCE SOIL-TEST P P PLACEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC P MANAGEMENT NO-TILL/STRIP-TILL NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR NITROGEN APPLICATION RATE  ...
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Spring flowers by College Creek

We're all a bit stir-crazy and can benefit from spring weather and spring flowers.  If you're in Ames, I recommend walking east of the ISU campus, where (as of April 5) the ground is carpeted with blue flowered squills, Scilla siberica.  It's not often that you see that color blue in nature, or in that quantity! While you're there, take a peek in College Creek.  When I visited, the water was clear, the bottom was rocky, and it was full of 4-6 inch fish. This was great to see.  College Creek used to be a dump, but between legal action against businesses and mobile home parks that were discharging sewage, urban conservation projects, and the annual trash clean-up event, it's become a lovely place.  Most of our backyard streams have the same potential, if we treat them right. I should caution you that that E. coli levels in College Creek and other streams in Ames often exceed the primary contact recreation standard, but you're...
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Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Spring 2020

Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Spring 2020

There are signs of spring 2020 along the Lincoln Highway! In some places, snow has melted away and some flowers are busting through the soil. That means spring is just around the corner. Home and Garden Shows are being held in many communities across Iowa. Also Camping and Boating shows! These types of events get people excited for warmer weather and for the eventual summer.   Also check our our Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway Recreation and Camping brochure for ideas of where you can go along our route and enjoy the outdoors.  https://www.prrcd.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/10-18.UPD-Camp26RecBrochure.pdf What preparations are you making for spring? Cleaning closets? Raking the yard? Perusing garden catalogs and magazines? Getting your fishing gear ready? We all know that Thursday, March 19th is the first official day of spring, but, as Iowans, we know it can still snow in April and be chilly in May. What can we do in preparation in the meantime for the Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway to get ready for...
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Watershed Education With All Ages

Watershed Education With All Ages

Prairie Rivers of Iowa kicked off 2020 with watershed education for both the young and old. Over four sessions in January and February, watershed educator Dan Haug spoke with 20 retirees for an Osher Institute for Lifelong Learning (OLLI) class at the Iowa State University Alumni Center.  In addition to unpacking difficult topics like the Clean Water Act and water monitoring, Dan introduced the class to online resources he uses to find out about water quality in local rivers and lakes, and about landuse and soils in their watersheds.  The class brought back examples and asked questions about rivers, lakes, and drinking water in their home towns and vacation spots, giving us all a better picture of water quality issues and solutions around the state. On February 7-9, high school students from Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, Missouri, Minnesota, and Oklahoma attended a training on the ISU campus for the 4-H Ag Innovators Experience, sponsored by Bayer and the national 4-H council.  By training teenage...
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New Year’s Resolution: Eat Healthy, Support Local Farmers, Protect Land and Water

New Year’s Resolution: Eat Healthy, Support Local Farmers, Protect Land and Water

Thank you to the board members who brought in donuts and coworkers who brought home-baked desserts to the office in 2019.  As a result, my New Year’s resolution is to lose weight and eat healthier! Kidding aside, Prairie Rivers of Iowa is an organization with a long track record of supporting local food systems.  Local food is a much better framework for healthy eating than picking processed foods based on high-this or low-that claims on the box.  Whole foods—vegetables from the farmers market or CSA, eggs from my backyard chickens, fruit from U-pick orchards—are not just nutritious but a source of joy in the harvesting, purchasing, and cooking.  “Eat more locally grown fruits and vegetables in 2020” is a pledge that makes me look forward to the coming year rather than dreading it. But I’m not overweight and in pain because I don’t eat fruits and veg.  Like most members of my extended family, I have chronic health conditions that are exacerbated...
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KHOI interview with Story County Community Foundation and Prairie Rivers of Iowa Executive Director Penny Brown Huber

Story County Community Foundation Director Sunni Kamp recently talked with Prairie Rivers of Iowa Executive Director Penny Brown Huber about our past and present progress towards our Watersheds and Waterways work and Lincoln Highway Heritage Byway management during KHOI Community Radio's local talk. We'd especially want to thank the foundation for recently awarding us a grant that will help us further our water quality monitoring in the South Skunk Watershed! Click to listen. Interview starts at the 13:50 mark. ...
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