City Earns Revenue From Not Cutting Its Timberland

Originally Posted on Marketplace.org City Earns Revenue From Not Cutting Its Timberland by Jeff Tyler Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 05:00 Astoria, Oregon, the oldest American settlement on the West Coast, is the first city to raise money on the burgeoning carbon markets. Instead of harvesting trees for timber, Astoria will make money by maintaining its forest. Astoria owns more than 37,000 acres surrounding its watershed, which is more than 10 miles from town. Around the reservoir, the forest is dense with spruce, hemlock and Douglas fir. But outside the property boundaries, whole hillsides have been reduced to a sea of stumps. Looking at an aerial map, Astoria’s forester, Mike Barnes, pointed out areas that have been clear-cut. “All this is gone," he said. "This is gone. Gone, gone, gone.” Astoria could cut as much as 3 percent of its forest every year. Instead, city leaders decided to cut fewer trees and try something new. “We’re forgoing increased harvests in the future," Barnes said, "and staying at a...
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June is Invasive Species Awareness Month in Iowa

DES MOINES – Governor Terry Branstad proclaimed June as Invasive Species Awareness Month as a way to draw attention to the threat Iowa’s woodlands, wildlands and waterways are under from unwanted pests. Each year in Iowa, millions of dollars, both public and private, are spent to control invasive plants, insects, animals and diseases. Invasive species threaten Iowa’s lands and waters by competing with and destroying native plants and animals and by disrupting complex natural ecosystems. Emerald ash borer, zebra mussels, oriental bittersweet, Eurasian watermilfoil, and bighead and silver carp make the news as they increase their presence in the state. “Awareness of invasive species is an important first step towards behavior change which can prevent the introduction and spread of invasive species in Iowa,” read the proclamation. “Invasive Species Awareness Month is an opportunity for government to join forces with business, industry, conservation groups, recreation groups, community organization and cities to take action against the introduction and spread of invasive species.” For more information on...
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Urban Food Forests Make Fruit Free For The Picking

To discover the new frontier of urban farming, you'll have to look up — and look sharp — for hanging fruit. Urban orchards are dropping everything from apples to persimmons to avocados on Seattle, Bloomington, Ind., Boston, Toronto, San Francisco,Los Angeles and other North American cities. Groups like the Portland Fruit Tree Project advocate for public access to existing fruit trees so that people can glean crops that would otherwise go uneaten — an idea someare calling radical. Other groups are more interested in planting new groves of fruit trees on previously fallow city land. Fruit trees produce food, but also provide shade, keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere, improve water quality and may even deter crime. Advocates say they also have a longer lasting impact on communities than vegetable beds. To read more please check out the whole article on the NPR website: Urban Food Forests Make Fruit Free For The Picking    ...
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Fruit Tree Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage

Fruit growers in northern Michigan grow apples, peaches and wine grapes. But the big crop here is tart cherries. More than half of Ken Engle's 140-acre farm is planted with what he calls sour cherries. These trees are the most vulnerable just before their white blossoms unfold at the so-called water bud stage. And in orchard country, extreme heat and cold can mean mass crop damage. "And what causes the damage is, on a cold night the moisture that's in the blossom will actually freeze," Engle says. "It will break the cell wall and the blossom is killed." Past losses now have researchers looking at new ways to use old technologies to save those crops. To find out what tricks are being used to help prevent crop loss, check the full article on the NPR website. Fruit Growers Try Tricking Mother Nature To Prevent Crop Damage ...
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2015 Midwest Fire Conference: Keeping Fire Working for the Land

2015 Midwest Fire Conference: Keeping Fire Working for the Land Dubuque, Iowa, Feb. 17-19, 2015 Join your fellow land managers, fire managers, ecologists, researchers, volunteers, and land owners - connected through our common challenges of keeping fire working for the land. This year the conference includes a special track on fire in oak-dominated systems, including case studies from land managers who have restored fire to degraded systems in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Visit the conference home page to learn about sessions, registration, and other details - http://www.tposfirescience.org/mwfire15-overview/ Or see the latest newsletter from the Tallgrass Prairie Oak Savanna Fire Science Consortium with links to program updates and registration information - http://bit.ly/MWfire15spk If you have any questions please contact Tivon Feeley at Tivon.Feeley@dnr.iowa.gov...
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Trees For Kids Grant Applications Now Available

Trees For Kids applications are available online for schools and communities to involve youth in planting trees on School grounds and other public property. In 2014, Trees For Kids Grants were awarded to 40 schools and communities which planted more than 1,600 landscape trees, and involved over 5,200 youth. Trees For Kids Grants pay up to $5,000 for landscape trees and mulch for schools and other public areas.  Trees may be planted in either spring or fall.  The deadline for submitting a spring application is March 2, 2015. Each planting project is required to have an educational component with the youth, and Project Learning Tree training is also provided to educators to create lesson plans and utilize curriculum with the planted trees. Trees planted around schools and in neighborhoods have been shown to give youth increased levels of concentration, lower levels of aggression, lower levels of obesity, and fewer symptoms of ADHD. Communities are made more livable by having a healthy, diverse tree canopy. The Trees...
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Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed In Five Southern Iowa Counties

EMERALD ASH BORER CONFIRMED IN FIVE COUNTIES IN SOUTHERN IOWA For Immediate Release: Monday, Dec. 15, 2014 Contacts: Dustin Vande Hoef, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, 515-281-3375 Kevin Baskins, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, 515-725-8288 Laura Sternweis, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, 515-294-0775 EMERALD ASH BORER CONFIRMED IN FIVE COUNTIES IN SOUTHERN IOWA Larvae discovered in Appanoose, Lucas, Mahaska, Marion, and Monroe counties; brings total to eighteen counties with confirmed infestations DES MOINES – Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been positively identified in Appanoose, Lucas, Mahaska, Marion and Monroe counties in southern Iowa. EAB kills all ash tree species and is considered to be one of the most destructive tree pests ever seen in North America. The discovery of this series of infestations started when forestry contractor found many dead ash trees with heavy woodpecker flecking while completing a timber stand improvement project on privately-owned woodland on the far eastern edge of Lucas County.  The infestation appears to have been in place for several years. The larvae...
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Lifted On Giant Inner Tubes, An Old Tree Moves In Michigan

For as many as 250 years, a bur oak has been growing on what is now the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor. The big tree stands in the way of an expansion of the Ross Business School. But instead of cutting it down, the university is moving the tree. It's not easy, it's not cheap, and it's definitely not fast. All this know-how, labor and equipment is expensive. The move will cost about $400,000, money that came from $100 million donated for the expansion by philanthropist Stephen Ross, for whom the business school was renamed. University spokesman Rick Fitzgerald says the school has never moved a tree this large before. "We didn't know if it could be moved," Fitzgerald says. "We started exploring options, and come to find out there are companies that do this and have been successfully moving large trees for decades." Follow the link to find out exactly how they completed this massive undertaking: Lifted On Giant Inner Tubes, An Old...
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Why Are Pine Nuts So Expensive

If you like making delicious dishes like pesto you might have wondered to yourself, "why are pine nuts so expensive?". It's mostly because pine nuts are not grown on farms or plantations they're collected in the wild. "Pine nuts don't generally come from orchards, or fields, or plantations. They come from pine forests. (And pine nuts are expensive because most of these areas are so remote.) The nuts are hidden inside the cones of certain species of pine, such as the mighty Siberian pine, which covers thousands of square miles of Siberia. A few pine nut plantations have been set up in Spain and Portugal, but they produce only a tiny portion of the world's pine nuts." To learn more about the fascinating pine nut industry check out this article from NPR: Love Pine Nuts? Then Protect Pine Forests...
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Emerald Ash Borer Found In Johnson County

Emerald Ash Borer Found in Johnson County Posted: 06/13/2014 IOWA CITY – An adult female emerald ash borer collected by an Iowa City resident has been positively identified as the destructive beetle by a federal identifier on Thursday. A follow-up examination of ash trees growing near the area where the beetle was collected has failed to confirm an infestation. “It is fairly unusual to discover an adult emerald ash borer without any further evidence of an infestation, but it does serve as another reminder to homeowners and communities that the threat from this destructive beetle is very real,” said state entomologist Robin Pruisner of the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. State experts will continue monitoring ash trees in the area looking for signs of emerald ash borers. A statewide quarantine restricting the movement of hardwood firewood, ash logs, wood chips and ash tree nursery stock out of Iowa into non-quarantined areas of other states was issued on Feb. 4, 2014 and remains in...
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