Cabins Going Up in Buena Vista County

Our Log Products program specializes in providing Iowa White Oak logs for cabins. Our log cabin logs have a history of quality and durability, and are not found in mainstream construction channels. Because of this we have had the opportunity to work with several County Parks and private individuals giving them the chance to build a cabin to stand a lifetime. The summer of 2014 Prairie Rivers of Iowa’s Log Product Program secured a contract to supply Buena Vista County Conservation with our Iowa White Oak logs for the start of construction on a 25’ x 32’ two-loft cabin. Construction started late fall in 2014. The walls and roof are installed and completion of the cabin should be this summer. Mike will be making a service call on Wednesday, April 22nd to talk more with their contractor and the Buena Vista County Conservation Director to answer any questions they have and to offer advice on the continuation of construction. Using our native Iowa White...
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Why We Choose Iowa Native White Oak

When you are building anything, choosing the best wood species for the product is key. Functionality, beauty, grain, and strength are just a few of the key reasons to keep in mind. Many wonder when we talk about building our log cabins why we prefer Iowa White Oak. Yes, your cabin can be made out of almost any type of wood but we are particularly fond of native Iowa White Oak and here is why.   - White oak is one of the strongest woods available Being strong is a must when it comes to building. Oak is one of  the strongest woods available, meaning it can withstand a lot!   - White oak cabins are low-maintenance Low-maintenance is key, as this helps bring a lower cost to the person taking care of the cabin. White Oak is very resistant to insect and fungal attacks.   - Iowa white oak is naturally decay resistant Being naturally decay resistant means better for the environment and the pocket book. There is no need to...
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The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, the second best time is now!

Here is an answer to a question I had recently about if there are any value to soft maple trees that were blown down in a storm... Unfortunately soft maple trees are not worth much.  There are two major problems with these trees.   Trees that are from a yard, or a farmstead most loggers and sawmill will not be interested in because of the high possibility of having metal scrapes in them from such items as bird feeders, clothes lines, signs, swings, fences, etc. that are all fastened with nails or screws.  If you hit one these old nails or screws with your saw mill it could ruin a blade which could cost anywhere from $50 to $500 +.  The value of the wood out one of these yard trees does not come close to paying for the damaged saw blade.   The other problem with some storm damaged trees is the the same winds that blew them down or damaged them may have...
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Giving Back – Brandrup’s Timber Part 3

  This story is in three parts. Make sure to keep an eye out for each piece to learn more about The Hamilton County Conservation Board is proud to proclaim its newest public wildlife management area that will be known as “Brandrup’s Timber”. Part 3 Pat and I could not have done this by ourselves.  It is also about partnerships, shared visions, and dedication of conservation minded organizations.  specifically, the Hamilton County Conservation Board, Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Hamilton County Pheasants Forever, The National Wild Turkey Federation, Eagle Grove and Little Wall Lake Chapters of White Tails Unlimited, and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Habitat Stamp Fund.  The opportunity to “Give Back” wouldn’t have happened without their help, support and shared visions for the future of everyone.” “Brandrup’s Timber” is 112 acres in size and is comprised of native timber, restored prairie grasses and wetland.  It is located 2 miles north of Webster City on White Fox Road and 1 mile west...
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Giving Back – Brandrup’s Timber Part 2

This story is in three parts. Make sure to keep an eye out for each piece to learn more about The Hamilton County Conservation Board is proud to proclaim its newest public wildlife management area that will be known as “Brandrup’s Timber”.   Part 2 My grandparents started to acquire the land in the 1940’s and our family has owned the land since.  It is this land that taught me the work ethic of agriculture, instilled the life long passion for hunting and fishing, and the marvel of nature that guided me into a career in forestry and natural resource management.  It is this land that has provided the resources to help sustain five generations of Brandrup’s.   As my wife Pat and I began to look to the future we realized we had the opportunity to do something that maybe hadn’t happened since the time of settlement, or the time the ownership of the land was granted to one person.  We had the opportunity...
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Giving Back – Brandrup’s Timber

This story is in three parts. Make sure to keep an eye out for each piece to learn more about The Hamilton County Conservation Board is proud to proclaim its newest public wildlife management area that will be known as “Brandrup’s Timber”. Part 1 The Hamilton County Conservation Board is proud to proclaim its newest public wildlife management area that will be known as “Brandrup’s Timber”.  The story of this land and its designation as public land begins with Mike and Pat Brandrup and their story of the lands journey. “The land we call our farm was once part the Native American culture, owned by no one and shared by all, and used for centuries.   In 1803 the United States government acquired the land as part of the Louisiana Purchase. According to the land abstracts, our farm was deeded from the federal government to a private individual in the 1854, and has been owned by over 30 individual and families.  During the 160 years...
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Work on New Cabins Continues

The Iowa outdoors provide scenic summer views and breathtaking color in the fall. Prairie Rivers of Iowa hopes that local residents and visitors alike will be able to enjoy these natural beauties year round. The Log products program has assisted the Hamilton County conservation board to construct several white oak cabins.   Local publications are taking notice of the unlimited potential the cabins will bring to local tourism. The Daily Freeman-Journal recently chronicled the cabins progress.(http://www.freemanjournal.net/page/content.detail/id/523606/Work-on-new-cabin-continues.html?nav=5006 )   The Log Products program provides conservation boards across Iowa with future opportunities to increase tourism and local revenue.  ...
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Prairie Rivers of Iowa Partners with Iowa State University’s College of Business’s New CyBIZ Lab Program

Prairie Rivers of Iowa along with the Hamilton County Conservation Board have partnered together to bring a project to Iowa State University's College of Business's new CyBIZ Lab program. A team of graduate and undergrad students will be heading our project along with a couple of other projects from various companies, such as WebFilings and the Iowa Arboretum. Our project cycle will run from February to the end of April. Prairie Rivers of Iowa and Hamilton County Conservation Board are excited to see what marketing analysis and other results the team comes up with as recommendations. To read more about this new program visit the link below. http://www.iowastatedaily.com/news/article_2c865c56-9430-11e3-9d01-0019bb2963f4.html...
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Take a listen to the WHO Radio “The Big Show” interview

Listen to the interview done by Doug Cooper on WHO Radio's "The Big Show." Here Hamilton County Conservation Board's Executive Director Brian Lammers and Prairie Rivers of Iowa's Log Products Coordinator, Mike Brandrup talk about their partnership through cabins and our log products. To learn more about our log products check out our Log Products page. To learn more about Hamilton County Conservation and all the amenities they have to offer go to: MyCountyParks.com To learn more about WHO Radio go to: www.whoradio.com   ...
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