Watersheds + Waterways Program: Message From Our Director

Watersheds + Waterways Program: Message From Our Director

Guiding and leading a not-for-profit is unique when offering solutions to citizens and their problems.  In Prairie Rivers of Iowa’s case, our solutions are supporting Iowa’s environment and natural resources.  This unique place our organization finds itself in is the opportunity to work with a variety of people who care and love Iowa as much as we do.  In order for our work to be relevant, we must have vision that encourages Iowans to learn, understand and be committed to our natural resources in some way. I am always asking our staff to look in the past some and keep an eye on the day-to-day, so we can plot our direction for the future.  It sounds challenging; but often looking back can show us how far our work has lifted up an idea, a solution, and commitments to change.  Our plans for today must be realistic and support where people are in their mindset and how they value our environment.  We...
Read More
Delivering Technical Assistance to Under-served Small Landowners: A Pilot Project in the Squaw Creek Watershed

Delivering Technical Assistance to Under-served Small Landowners: A Pilot Project in the Squaw Creek Watershed

We all see it. We all drive through it and we, for the most part, don’t think much about it.  It is that transition that happens when you leave the city limits of a community like Ames and you head into the county or farm land of Iowa.  It is that zone where structured homes and home development transitions to acreages and single family dwellings and continues to small farms or even larger acreages and eventually moves and transitions into the more traditional larger production farming agriculture of Iowa.  This transition area is what Prairie Rivers of Iowa has come to call the Urban Fringe.  It is that land and group of landowners, homeowners, and farmers that occupy that transitions ground between the city and large-scale agriculture. These landowners have chosen to live here for many reasons, some being: more space, aesthetics, fewer neighbors, space for animals and gardens, and the ability do and have more.  The reality is that...
Read More
Cover Crop Week: October 14-20, 2018

Cover Crop Week: October 14-20, 2018

October 14-20, 2018 is Cover Crop Week in Iowa! As harvest continues (if the rain ever subsides), you will start seeing green in fields again. The green is actually cover crops, which are plants used in the off-season of cash crops planted to protect the soil in the vulnerable months of October through May. We have created a video about cover crops to give you an overview of the use and benefits of cover crops: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDBqx5Eurro. We have also created a fact sheet about cover crops to learn more: ...
Read More
Cover Crops Can Pay! – Environmental Defense Fund Study Concludes Financial Benefits

Cover Crops Can Pay! – Environmental Defense Fund Study Concludes Financial Benefits

A recent study published by the Environmental Defense Fund outlines the financial benefits of cover crops in a row-crop operation. This, coupled with the environmental benefits, creates a practice that is both practical and vital to our state. This study used an agricultural accounting firm, called K-Coe Isom, to take an in-depth look at three producer's financial books after using cover crops and no-till. One of the farmers in the study is from Nevada, Iowa and the other two farmers are from Kansas and Ohio. Items that were considered for the study were fertilizer costs, herbicide costs, and crop yields after long-term use of cover crops and no-till. The budget categories identified were revenue, input costs, variable costs, and fixed costs. Key Findings from the study include: Conservation practices can pay. Farmers who adopted conservation practices - combinations of no-till, cover crops, nutrient optimization, and crop rotations - reported a cascade of cost savings throughout their budgets, including lower fertilizer, labor, fuel, and equipment...
Read More
Upcoming Events: Native Plant Management & Gully Erosion Workshops

Upcoming Events: Native Plant Management & Gully Erosion Workshops

You're Invited to two upcoming workshops we are co-hosting with Story County Conservation! This series is called "Conservation Conversations" and we will be discussing and doing hands-on activities to learn about various conservation topics. This first workshop is on Tuesday, September 25th from 5-7PM and there is no cost to attend. This workshop will be focused on native lands management. The second workshop is on Saturday, October 13 from 9AM - 4PM and costs $15 for the day. This workshop will focus on gully erosion and practices to fight erosion. Please call 515.232.0048 to RSVP to either or both of these events! ...
Read More
Bioreactors: A Crucial Practice in Nutrient Reduction for Iowa

Bioreactors: A Crucial Practice in Nutrient Reduction for Iowa

On a warm summer evening in July, landowners, farmers, and community citizens gathered together at Iowa State’s Field Extension Education Laboratory to learn what they can about the benefits and a little science behind denitrifying bioreactors. A denitrifying bioreactor is a subsurface trench at the edge of a field usually filled with hardwood chips, installed to reduce nitrate concentration in the tile water that it diverts. The wood chips are the carbon source that contains the bacteria needed to breakdown the nitrates in the water to convert into nitrogen gas.   The participants were able to see a bioreactor in action and heard from Iowa Learning Farms expert, Liz Juchems about the benefits to having a bioreactor and how it can help in the effort to improving water quality. She explained that using bioreactors alone in the state in all of the identified appropriate areas would reduce the nitrates that end up in our waterways by 43%, which exceeds the 41% goal...
Read More
Local Leaders Tour Watershed to Learn About Practices that Improve Water Quality

Local Leaders Tour Watershed to Learn About Practices that Improve Water Quality

Along with a quarterly formal business meeting, the Squaw Creek Watershed Management Authority Board visits a site in the watershed to learn more about practices that improve soil health and water quality.   The Squaw Creek Watershed Management Authority Board is comprised of a representative from the cities, counties, and soil & water conservation districts in the Squaw Creek Watershed. The are representatives from the cities of Stanhope, Stratford, Gilbert, and Ames; the county board of supervisors from Boone and Story County; and the soil & water conservation districts in Hamilton, Boone, and Story County. Although it is common misconception of the word 'authority' in their title, the group acts as more of an alliance of communities and counties coming together to support each other in their efforts in water quality improvement.   July's quarterly meeting offered a glimpse at an uncommon site in Hamilton County - a dairy cow herd. Kevin and Ranae Dietzel operate their dairy herd business, called Lost Lake Farms,...
Read More
Newest Staff Addition – Watershed Assistant

Newest Staff Addition – Watershed Assistant

Hi, everyone! My name is Abby Brayton and I am the Watershed Assistant for the Watersheds & Waterways Program at Prairie Rivers of Iowa. I am currently in my final year at Iowa State University studying Landscape Architecture with a minor in Urban Studies. I am originally from Iowa City and grew up playing lots of sports, especially outside. Recently, I studied at the University of Hawaii at Hilo and had a chance to experience a culture that values their land more than anything and makes sure to take care of it. In my free time I love to travel with my friends whether it’s a short road trip or flying across the country! I am most looking forward to learning about all of the great volunteering opportunities that are available to everyone, even college students like me! If you have any questions about what I am doing this summer or about watershed videos or social media, please feel free to email me at...
Read More
Protecting a Watershed while Building a Source Water Protection Plan

Protecting a Watershed while Building a Source Water Protection Plan

Nestled up in the northern reaches of the Squaw Creek Watershed, in southwestern Hamilton County, sits a small community with large potential - all because of some great community leaders and members. Beginning in 2017, the City of Stanhope's elected officials made the decision to develop a source water protection plan after elevated levels of nutrients were being discovered in the samples taken from their wells. The group of council members and mayor, along with their city clerk and public works technicians, partnered with Iowa Rural Water Association to begin the process of developing a protection plan for their source water. To give you some background, source water is water that is naturally occurring in a stream, river, or underground (aquifer) and going to be captured, treated, and distributed for drinking water. Stanhope has 2 active well sites that are drawing water from underground aquifers, each reaching over 550 ft deep. These wells have capture zones, which are estimated areas surrounding the...
Read More